The move, which faces fierce opposition from a group of Hull fans, is the idea of owner Assem Allam, who believes it will enhance the club's commercial appeal.

"We have sent a letter to the Football Association this week asking for them to consider our request to change the club's playing name from next season," a Hull spokesman told Britain's Press Association.

Allam has already changed Hull's company name to Hull City Tigers, but he needs permission from English governing body the FA to change the club's playing name.

Allam previously described the 'City' suffix as "lousy" and common", prompting a wave of protests from fan group 'City Till We Die'.

The 74-year-old Egypt-born businessman sparked further controversy when he said of the protesters: "They can die as soon as they want; as long as they leave the club for the majority who just want to watch good football."

However, Allam has received support from manager Steve Bruce, who masterminded the club's promotion from the second-tier Championship at the end of last season.

"I can understand (the protests) because in our country especially, we are really big traditionalists and a lot of people have supported the club since the year dot, where it has been Hull City AFC (Association Football Club)," Bruce said last month.

"But the owner has come in and he's in a different culture and for the money he has put into the club, if he thinks Hull Tigers is his way forward, then we have to respect it."

Hull were promoted to the Premier League last year after a three-year absence from the English top flight.

The club's fans hope to avoid a fate similar to that which befell fellow promoted club Cardiff City, whose traditional colours of blue were changed to red in 2012 by Malaysian owner Vincent Tan.